Monday, March 5, 2018

african masks from recycled materials: milk jug construction



Title: African Masks From Recycled Materials: Milk Jug Construction
Topic: recycling, African culture
Goals and Objectives:
  • Students will make three-dimensional masks representing elements and principles of design used by African indigenous cultures.
  • Students will use recycled materials to construct an original mask.
  • Students will conduct research in the library or computer lab.
GLEs:
STRAND I: Product/Performance
3. Communicate ideas about subject matter and themes in artworks created for various purposes
A. High School Level I
·      Create original artworks using non-objective, architecture and anatomy subject matters.
STRAND IV: Interdisciplinary Connections (IC)
1. Explain connections between visual art and performing arts
A. High School Level I
·      Connect meanings of elements in art with terms in music, theatre, or dance
STRAND III: Artistic Perceptions (AP)
2. Analyze and evaluate art using art vocabulary
A. Art Criticism: High School Level I: With one artwork:
  • describe artwork;
  • analyze the use of elements and principles in the work;
  • Interpret the meaning of the work (subject, theme, symbolism, message communicated);
  • Judge the work from various perspectives:
  • Showing a real or idealized image of life (Imitationalism)
  • Expressing feelings (Emotionalism/ Expressionism)
  • Emphasis on elements and principles (Formalism)
  • Serving a purpose in the society or culture (Functionalism)
STRAND II: Elements and Principles (EP)
2. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork
E. Unity: High School Level I
·      Explain how elements and principles create unity in artworks
STRAND II: Elements and Principles (EP)
2. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork
F. Proportion: High School Level I
·      Identify and use realistic facial proportions
STRAND II: Elements and Principles (EP)
2. Select and use principles of art for their effect in communicating ideas through artwork
B. Emphasis: High School Level I
·      Identify and create emphasis (focal point) through contrast and convergence
Grade: 9th – 12th
Length of Class Period: 55 minutes
Frequency of Class Period: five days a week
Time Needed: six class periods
Facility & Equipment Requirements:
  • One computer lap top
  • Room with good lighting
  • Large tables, approximately ten, each seating four students
  • Two sinks
  • Dry erase board
  • Drying racks
  •  Cabinets for storage
  • Projector for viewing computer video, CDs and DVDs
Materials Per Student:
  • empty clean milk jug
  • sharp scissors
  • masking tape
  • newsprint
  • white school glue
  • paint
Vocabulary/Terminology:
  • Indigenous - are ethnic groups that are defined as indigenous according to one of the various definitions of the term, there is no universally accepted definition but most of which carry connotations of being the "original inhabitants" of a territory.
  • Tribe - A tribe, viewed historically or developmentally, consists of a social group existing before the development of, or outside of, states.
  • Mask - a protective covering worn over the face
  • Culture - the tastes in art and manners that are favored by a social group
Health & Safety Concerns: There are no health and safety concerns for this project.
Cleanup Time & Strategy: Students will be instructed to put away art materials neatly in their containers, clean off their tables, and recycle their trash two minutes prior to dismissal.
Assessment: A formal assessment/grading rubric sheet from your specific high school should be filled out per student.

all articles and lesson plans are copyrighted 2018 by Grimm


High School age students work on their own mask designs.




Wednesday, February 21, 2018

craft papier-mâché puzzle cones

       I made these puzzle cones to gift to a very special little person. With these simple parts she can mix and match her favorite ice cream flavors: vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, lemon, blue berry, rocky road, chocolate chip mint and butter pecan. 

Supply List:
  • paper mache pulp
  • plastic cones
  • masking tape
  • variety of acrylic paints
  • acrylic spray sealer
  • brown paper bags
  • a brown permanent felt tip marker
  • one-piece wooden clothes pins
  • newsprint
  • white school glue or Elmer's wood glue
Step-by-Step Directions:
  1. Wrap both the inside and outside of your plastic cone pieces with masking tape.
  2. Squeeze a generous amount of glue into the inside bottom of each cone and stuff newsprint around an inserted clothes pin. You clothes pins need to stick outside of each cone approximately two inches. Let the form dry over night. (see picture below)
  3. Cover the entire cone shape and pin sticking out with layers of glue and brown paper bag stripes. Let the forms dry overnight.
  4. Crush and shape the scoops of ice cream from newsprint around the tops of the clothes pins. 
  5. Mask both the inside hole and the outside ice cream scoop shapes.
  6. Using a bit of glue and paper line the interior holes with a dryer finished paper surface and let these shapes dry overnight.
  7. Now cover the outside surface of the ice cream scoops with paper mache pulp, following the instructions that come with that art modeling material. Let the scoops dry overnight. It may take longer than 24 hours for these surfaces to dry thoroughly.
  8. I drew diamond shapes onto my paper cones using a permanent ink pen, but you can use paint if you prefer.
  9. Paint your ice cream scoops to imitate what ever flavor of ice cream you prefer.
  10. After the surfaces are dry, seal these with a clear acrylic spray.
"Wrap both the inside and outside of your plastic cone pieces with masking tape."
"Crush and shape the scoops of ice cream from newsprint around the tops of the clothes pins. and
Mask both the inside hole and the outside ice cream scoop shapes."
The finished puzzle cones are ready for a little girl and her friends to play with!

Draw ice cream treats.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

porcupine quill artifacts

Share with your students a selection of quill decorated, Native American artifacts in a slide show or newsletter or print them out to include in a journal.  Back to the Index.
Man's quilled buckskin vest, Oglala Sioux, South Dakota. CA, 1880


Quill Decorated Deerskin Moccasins


Quill Decorated Knife Sheaths


Woven quillwork on caribou hide, left - flat pouch, center - knife sheath, right - pouch

Quill decorated birchbark box and cover from Nova Scotia

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

clip art of native american baskets

       Share with your students a selection of Native American artifacts in a slide show or newsletter or print them out to include in a journal. The following artifacts are from the Chetimacha, Wintun and Tulare tribes. Back to the Index.

Cane baskets of the Chetimacha Natives, Louisiana. In the National Museum
"Sitting" type of cradle used by the Wintun Native Americans of Northern California
Upper, Ancient ceremonial basket of exquisite workmanship
 from Santa Barbara County, California. Lower, Tulare trinket
 basket from the Tulare Native Reservation, California.
Both are in the National Museum.

material culture of north american plains indians

       Share with your students a selection of Native American artifacts in a slide show or newsletter or print them out to include in a journal. The following artifacts are from the Blackfoot and Dakota tribes. Back to the Index.
Medicine pipe of the Blackfoot

Wrapped medicine pipe of the Blackfoot

A buffalo hide shield from the Northern Blackfoot
Bag decorated with porcupine quills and beads from the Dakota

Fleshing tools. (The two short fleshers are of bone; the one on
the left is of iron; and that on the right, of bone, with an iron blade.)
A woman's dress of elkskin
A meat drying rack from the Blackfoot
Stone-headed pounders

A man's shirt from the Blackfoot

Sunday, June 4, 2017

anatomical portrait study lesson

The first sheet of the assignment,
the skull and the eye balls. 

Description: Our art class will study and illustrate the basic structure of the human head for this assignment. Students should accurately diagram and label the bone and tissue layers beneath the skin on three separate pieces of drawing paper.
      Human anatomy, which, with physiology and biochemistry, is a complementary basic medical science is primarily the scientific study of the morphology of the adult human body. Anatomy is subdivided into gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy. Gross anatomy is the study of anatomical structures that can be seen by unaided vision. Microscopic anatomy is the study of minute anatomical structures assisted with microscopes, which includes histology and cytology. Anatomy, physiology and biochemistry are complementary basic medical sciences which are usually taught together.
      In some of its facets human anatomy is closely related to embryology, comparative anatomy and comparative embryology, through common roots in evolution; for example, much of the human body maintains the ancient segmental pattern that is present in all vertebrates with basic units being repeated, which is particularly obvious in the vertebral column and in the rib cage, and can be traced from very early embryos.
      The human body consists of biological systems, that consist of organs, that consist of tissues, that consist of cells and connective tissue.
      The history of anatomy has been characterized, over a long period of time, by a continually developing understanding of the functions of organs and structures in the body. Methods have also advanced dramatically, advancing from examination of animals through dissection of preserved cadavers to technologically complex techniques developed in the 20th century.
      Generally, physicians, dentists, physiotherapists, nurses, paramedics, radiographers, artists, and students of certain biological sciences, learn gross anatomy and microscopic anatomy from anatomical models, skeletons, textbooks, diagrams, photographs, lectures, and tutorials. The study of microscopic anatomy can be aided by practical experience examining histological preparations under a microscope; and in addition, medical and dental students generally also learn anatomy with practical experience of dissection and inspection of cadavers A thorough working knowledge of anatomy is required by all medical doctors, especially surgeons, and doctors working in some diagnostic specialties, such as histopathology and radiology.
      Human anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry are basic medical sciences, which are generally taught to medical students in their first year at medical school. Human anatomy can be taught regionally or systemically; that is, respectively, studying anatomy by bodily regions such as the head and chest, or studying by specific systems, such as the nervous or respiratory systems. The major anatomy textbook, Gray's Anatomy, has recently been reorganized from a systems format to a regional format, in line with modern teaching methods.

Subjects: Medical Illustration

Instruction Time: Approximately three class periods

Materials needed:
  • Three sheets of drawing paper
  • Scissors
  • Colored pencils and pens
  • Stencil of skull
  • Photographs, diagrams, and pictures of human skulls and muscular structure to make a reference to
Objective(s): Show-Me Content Standard: Visual Art Standards for Missouri Schools 2009
Strand I: Product/Performance – Select and apply two-dimensional techniques, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual arts problems for 7th, 8th, 9th, and 10th Grades
  • Create smooth, continuous value through even pressure
  • Create a range of 4 smoothly graduated values through varied pressure
  • Define edge through variations in pressure or angle
  • Use media in various ways to create simulated and invented textures
  • Demonstrate proficiency using a single drawing media
  • Blend values/colors to create new values/colors
Strand IV: Interdisciplinary Connections, Explain the connections between Visual Art and Communication Arts, Math, Science or Social Studies
Show-Me Science Curriculum Guide Human Anatomy and Physiology – Characteristics and Interactions of Living Organisms: 1. There is a fundamental unity underlying the diversity of all living organisms
  • Define anatomical and directional terminology to appropriate structures.
Phase 1: Clarify goals and establish set
  • Students will study the differences between anatomical portraits and regular portraits.
  • Students will learn about the necessity of anatomical drawings in scientific study.
  • Students will draw their own versions of anatomically correct portraits to the proficiency of 80% required by the State of MO.
Phase 2: Demonstrate knowledge or skill
Task Analysis:
  • Students should visit the web sites provided by the teacher in the following bibliography.
  • Students will then work from a variety of pictorial references supplied in the classroom for the assignment.
  • The first drawing will illustrate a human skull, the second the muscle tissues of the human head, and the third the outside skin and hair of a anatomically correct human portrait.
  • Correct placement of eye, nose and mouth holes are demonstrated in the classroom sample and should be also cut from student drawings in a like manner
  • Anatomical portraits should be colored in naturalistically.
  • Staple all three drawings together in order of their appearance in real life skulls
Phase 3: Provide Guided Practice
  • The instructor will provide materials needed to describe visually the muscles and bone structure of the human head.
  • The instructor will describe and write out the details concerning the process of an anatomical portrait study.
  • The instructor will demonstrate the process involved with the layered drawing requirements.
Phase 4: Check for understanding and provide feedback – A standardized rubric will be used to analyze and critique each individual student’s artwork.

Phase 5: Provide extended practice and transfer – Students will be encouraged to create even more projects at home. Materials used during class may be duplicated in their own home. A handout for children to take home and color will be provided.

Reflections: Reflections are attached to rubric. There is room enough for both the instructor and student to respond.

Human Anatomy Bibliography:
Resources: The lesson plan adaptations and written content, excluding State Standards, is written and copyrighted by Kathy Grimm, 2009. The use of the ideas and 10% or less content constraint on previously published materials is met in accordance to United States copyright law. Some scientific definitions come from public domain resources. Interested parties may visit the following link to read about Fair Use and Teachers http://home.earthlink.net/~cnew/research.htm#Purpose%20of%20use

audubon's legacy lesson

Description: Audubon, a French-American ornithologist, hunter, and artist, developed his own methods for drawing birds. First, he killed them using fine shot. He then used wires to prop them into a natural position, unlike the common method of many ornithologists, who prepared and stuffed the specimens into a rigid pose. When working on a major specimen like an eagle, he would spend up to four 15-hour days, preparing, studying, and drawing it. His paintings of birds are set true-to-life in their natural habitat. He often portrayed them as if caught in motion, especially feeding or hunting. This was in stark contrast to the stiff representations of birds by his contemporaries, such as Alexander Wilson. Audubon based his paintings on his extensive field observations.
      He worked primarily with watercolor early on. He added colored chalk or pastel to add softness to feathers, especially those of owls and herons. He employed multiple layers of water-color, and sometimes used gouache. All species were drawn life size that accounts for the contorted poses of the larger birds as Audubon strove to fit them within the page size. Smaller species were usually placed on branches with berries, fruit, and flowers. He used several birds in a drawing to present all views of anatomy and wings. Larger birds were often placed in their ground habitat or perching on stumps. At times, as with woodpeckers, he combined several species on one page to offer contrasting features. He frequently depicted the birds' nests and eggs, and occasionally natural predators, such as snakes. He usually illustrated male and female variations, and sometimes juveniles. In later drawings, Audubon used assistants to render the habitat for him. Going beyond faithful renderings of anatomy, Audubon employed carefully constructed composition, drama, and slightly exaggerated poses to achieve artistic as well as scientific effects. Read more...


Subject: Fine Art/Biology

Instruction Time: Three sessions at least

Materials needed:
  • White drawing paper
  • Audubon prototype
  • Colored pencils and watercolors
Objective(s):
Show-Me Visual Art Standards for Missouri Schools
Strand I: Product/Performance – Select and apply two-dimensional media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual art problems for all high school grades.
  • Select and apply drawing media and techniques that demonstrate both sensitivity and subtlety in use of media and informed decision making
Strand IV: Interdisciplinary Connections, Explain the connections between Visual Art and Communication Arts, Math, Science or Social Studies
  • Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods.
Show-Me Standards for Biology
Strand 7: Scientific Inquiry – Science understanding is developed through the use of science process skills, scientific knowledge, scientific investigation, reasoning, and critical thinking
  • Concept B. Scientific inquiry relies upon gathering evidence from qualitative and quantitative observations. - Determine the appropriate tools and techniques to collect, analyze and interpret data.
Phase 1: Clarify goals and establish set
  • Students will study the watercolors and drawings of the famous orinthologist John James Audubon by observing a slide presentation, reading the attachment about him following this lesson plan and visiting web sites.
  • Students will copy prototypes of Audubon’s work and develop their skills in watercolors and colored pencils.
Phase 2: Demonstrate knowledge or skill
Task Analysis: rewrite below
  1. Students will research the life of Audubon through a selection of provided materials.
  2. Students will select a prototype of James Audubon.
  3. Make tracings or stencils to transfer the prototype to fine watercolor paper and paint.
Phase 3: Provide Guided Practice
  • The teacher will show a slide presentation of John James Audubon’s life.
  • The teacher will assign to each student a prototype to work from.
  • The teacher will demonstrate methods of watercolor and drawing to the class during the sessions.
Phase 4: Check for understanding and provide feedback – A standardized rubric will be used to analyze and critique each individual student’s artwork.

Phase 5: Provide extended practice and transfer – Students will be encouraged to create even more projects at home. Materials used during class and the research conducted on their own computers at home may be duplicated in their own home environment at very little expense.

Reflections: Reflections are attached to rubric. There is room enough for both the instructor and student to respond. Copies of reflections are returned to students to keep in their three ring binders. (phase 4 above)

Resources: The lesson plan adaptations and written content, excluding State Standards, is written and copyrighted by Kathy Grimm, 2009. The use of the ideas and 10% or less content constraint on previously published materials is met in accordance to United States copyright law. Some scientific definitions come from public domain resources. Interested parties may visit the following link to read about Fair Use and Teachers http://home.earthlink.net/~cnew/research.htm#Purpose%20of%20use